8 Best Amps for Telecaster – Country, Blues & Rock

Author: Ross McLeod | Updated: | This post may contain affiliate links.

With its iconic tone, signature twang, and unrivaled playability, the Fender Telecaster has continued to define guitar music for decades. Choosing the best amp for a Telecaster is integral if you want to enjoy its fullest potential.

The interaction between a guitar and an amplifier is what forms the foundation of your tone. Certain amps are better suited to particular types of guitar. In this guide, you’ll find the amplifiers that naturally work best with a Telecaster.

Best Amps for Fender & Squier Telecasters

The JC-40 by Roland is brilliantly suited to highlighting the legendary clean tone of a Fender Tele. It emphasizes the details of the guitar, providing classic clean tones and an array of onboard processing capabilities.

A Jazz Combo amp, the JC-40 has two 10 inches, 40-watt speakers which produce its powerful projection. It’s the smaller sibling of the popular JC-120, sacrificing some of the bulkiness but not compromising on clarity of tone.

Historically, the Telecaster has been used to create a vast range of sonic textures and distinctive tones. This is largely due to its fantastic compatibility with almost all of the popular guitar effects.

Roland has paid extra attention to the effects unit of the JC-40. This newly updated section includes chorus, vibrato, reverb, and distortion. So, if you don’t have access to guitar pedals, you can still enjoy tone-bending effects with this amp.

The standout effect installed on the JC-40 is its lush, vintage chorus. Roland designed their Dimensional Space Chorus stereo effect specifically for installation on their amplifiers.

Another interesting feature is the distortion circuit, which can be controlled using a footswitch. Unlike some digital distortions that can sound tinny and harsh, this effect produces a smooth, authentic, saturated tone.

In addition to being highly compatible with a Telecaster, the Roland JC-40 also doubles up as a capable keyboard amplifier. It slightly colors the tone of the instrument but stays true to its original sound.

PROS

  • Conveniently sized Jazz Chorus amp
  • Onboard reverb, chorus, distortion, and reverb
  • Stereo effects loop

CONS

  • Perhaps not loud enough for playing in larger venues

Vox amplifiers are renowned for the classic, British-invasion tones they have produced for the best part of half a century. The AC101C is an all-tube, 10-watt combo amp which despite its compact size, has plenty of power in reserve.

The warm coloration and sparkling clean tone that the AC101C houses are largely due to the inclusion of a custom Celestion 10-inch speaker.

This, combined with the gain control, allows you to access the authentic tube breakups that are so highly sought after amongst guitarists.

In addition to the gain control, there are also knobs for adjusting master volume, treble, bass, and reverb. The onboard reverb adds a dimension of space to your Telecaster’s sound and can be varied from subtle to noticeably prominent.

Purists would argue that the Fender Telecaster sounds best when played through an all-tube amplifier. When you hear it with the Vox AC10C1, it’s hard to argue with that notion.

The naturally smooth, rich tone of the Tele blends effortlessly with the range of settings contained in this amp. You can push the tubes to the point of warm saturation, or bring down the gain to enjoy crisp, articulate clean tones.

Also featured on this amp is the classic Top Boost circuitry that Vox is famous for originating. This allows you to instantly increase the prominence of the treble frequencies, perhaps for melody playing or soloing.

An onboard 2-band EQ also increased the control you have over the frequencies produced by your Telecaster. This is highly useful if you’re using effects pedals as you can tailor the setting to suit your pedals.

PROS

  • All-tube 10-watt combo amp
  • Features the classic Top Boost circuitry
  • Combination of 12AX7 and EL84 tubes
  • Smooth, immersive onboard reverb

CONS

  • None

It makes perfect logical sense that the creator of the Telecaster would know exactly how to produce an amplifier that gets the best of out the guitar. With the ’65 Princeton Reverb, Fender has done just that.

Based on the legendary 60s tube amplifier, the Princeton Reverb is great for rehearsing, recording, and live performances. It taps into the vintage tube tone that Fender famously created in the golden era of rock n’ roll music.

The specially voiced Jensen 10 inch speaker is powered by 15 watts and is capable of producing a versatile selection of sounds. You can plugin and play to enjoy the detailed clean tone of your Telecaster, or ramp up the gain for a more edgy output.

One of the main qualities that made the original Princeton Reverb Amp of the 1960s so popular amongst guitarists, was its lightweight design. Originally intended for practice purposes, it soon became a staple for studios and stages across the globe.

With this modern edition of the classic amplifier, Fender has combined state-of-the-art components with the main principles used to create the wonderful early version of the Princeton Reverb.

The tubes used in this amp consist of three 12AX7s, a single 12AT7, a pair of 6V6s, and finally a 5AR4 rectifier tube. This combination creates an output of power, energy, smoothness, and precision that is perfectly suited to a Tele.

PROS

  • 15-watt all-tube amp
  • Capable of producing a wide range of tones
  • Based on the hugely popular 60s model
  • Onboard reverb and vibrato effects

CONS

  • None

When used in combination with effects pedals, the Telecaster can shapeshift into countless sonic possibilities. The renowned Tele twang provides the perfect building blocks for processed tones.

That’s why it’s perfectly suited to the Katana-50 MkII by BOSS. Arguably the most prolific producer of guitar effects in the world, BOSS, in addition to its innovative stompbox range, has redefined the possibilities of onboard amp effects.

The Katana-5 MkII houses a total of 60 timeless BOSS effects. These include classic reverbs, delays, modulation-based effects, and distortions. Also, you gain access to several amp variations and cab emulators.

Or, if you simply want to enjoy the pristine clean tone of your Tele, the 12-inch speaker is defined and articulate. You can also find a middle ground using the five distinct amp voicings, which include Clean, Crunch, and Lead.

For further tweaking the sound of this amplifier, BOSS also includes access to the Tone Studio editor software, where you can customize the various settings and parameters and sculpt unique tones.

Another benefit of the Katana-50 MkII is its ability to silently record. The onboard Power Control facilitates cranked amp-tones, without requiring high volumes.

You can use the onboard USB and headphone output to enjoy low-noise recordings or playback. 

PROS

  • Includes five distinct amp voicings
  • 60 high-quality effects
  • Silent recordings with high gain/low volume

CONS

  • Solid-state design – no tube saturation

With its distinguished aesthetics and abundance of adjustable parameters, the V22 Infinium by Bugera is a perfect companion for your Fender or Squire Telecaster.

Guitar combo amplifiers are hit and miss. Some manage to encapsulate vintage tones, while others sound a little artificial and overly processed. The V22 Infinium falls into the former category, exuberating warm, authentic guitar tones that suit a range of genres.

The main driving force behind the amp’s tonality is its selection of tubes. With three reliable 12AX7s in the preamp section and a pair of EL84s in the power tube section, Bugera has ensured ample output power and character.

Also included with this Bugera tube amp is a classic-style 3-band EQ for frequency tailoring and the revered Infinium Tube Life Multiplier which ensures that the valves last for a considerable length of time.

With two independent channels, onboard reverb, and a British-style Turbosound speaker, the V22 Infinium is a reliable choice to pair with your Tele. Whether you play blues, country, rock, or heavier genres, this amp will perform capably.

PROS

  • Driven by 12AX7 preamp tubes and EL84 power tubes
  • Highlights the sweet harmonics of a Telecaster
  • Onboard reverb and 3-band EQ
  • Normal and bright inputs

CONS

  • None

The Fender Blues Junior IV is a magnificent tube combo amp, with a distinctive, retro design, and versatile tonality. It has Western Tolex clothing, which gives the amp a rare, unique appearance.

This 15-watt, 1 x 12-inch combo amp is conveniently sized. Unlike many tube amps that are difficult to transport from the rehearsal space to the stage, the Blues Junior IV is compact and manageable.

Although this amp does produce some coloration, it is remarkably clean sounding when the gain is turned down low. This is ideal for a Telecaster, as it allows you to create your tones using the guitar’s natural sound, or through the use of effects pedals.

This special edition Blues Junior amp has a slightly tweaked preamp, which Fender chose to increase tonality. It also houses classic, smooth reverb to bathe the tone of your Telecaster in.

The Blues Junior has been a favorite amongst rock and blues guitarists for decades, due to its impeccable tube-driven tones. This newly improved version retains the character of the original but adds a new dimension to the amp’s performance.

The inclusion of an Eminence Cannabis Rex speaker adds even more power to the Blues Junior IV, especially in the low-end.

Whether you play jangly chords on your Tele or use it for stomping blues riffs, you’ll love the sound of it combined with the Blues Junior IV.

PROS

  • Ideally sized for transportation
  • 3-band EQ and newly designed reverb unit
  • Updated preamp section for a larger sound
  • Versatile tonality

CONS

  • Lacks the power required for playing in larger venues

The latest addition to Fender’s popular Mustang line, this GTX 100 solid-state amplifier is packed with tone-tweaking options. It is ideal for guitarists who need a wide range of tones for performing and recording.

Included with the GTX 100 are over 200 presets, several cabinet models, and a wide span of effects. There literally isn’t a tone that you can’t produce when you pair this amp with a Telecaster.

With a 12 inch Celestion speaker driven by 100 watts of solid-state power, this amplifier certainly packs a punch. It is also compatible with the free TONE 3.0 smartphone app, which can be used to adjust the effects and presets and create your tones.

PROS

  • An upgraded edition of the popular Mustang amp
  • Over 200 presets & 40 amp models
  • 12 inch Celestion speaker

CONS

  • If you don’t require effects, this amplifier may be overly complex

With its classy tweed design, the Super Champ X2 looks like it was made in the late 50s. It’s conveniently sized and produces a well-rounded tone with plenty of power when the gain is cranked up. 

The 10-inch Eminence Ragin Cajun speaker produces classic American rock tones, with a prominent bottom end, and sparkling highs. It responds commendably to the fine details of a Telecaster.

In total there are 15 effects included with the Super Champ X2. You also get a tap tempo control for synchronizing the delay effect with the beat of a song or backing track.

The inclusion of two 6V6 power tubes and one 12AX7 preamp tube results in a classic, authentic tone.

PROS

  • 15-watt tube combo amp
  • A warm tone with thick low-end
  • Driven by two 6V6 and one 12AX7 tube

CONS

  • None

Telecaster Amps – Tube vs. Solid State

Whether a Telecaster sounds best with a tube amp or a solid-state amp is a frequently debated topic amongst guitarists. Essentially it comes down to personal preference, but there are some clear benefits and drawbacks of both.

Tube Amps & Telecasters

If you enjoy authentic, vintage tones, then choosing a tube amplifier is probably the best option. Despite their reduced wattage, tube amps are generally louder, and they provide the sought-after saturated tube overdrive when the gain is turned up. 

Solid State Amps & Telecasters

The advantage of pairing your Tele with a solid-state amplifier is that you will gain access to an array of onboard effects, presets, and amp modelers. They’re also usually less heavy than their tube equivalents.

Conclusion

The Telecaster is such a wonderful instrument that it deserves to be used with a high-quality, complementary amplifier. Hopefully, you’ve now identified the perfect choice for your requirements!

About Ross McLeod

Ross is a music producer, multi-instrumentalist and songwriter. He is the frontman of The Blue Dawns, where he handles vocal and bass duties. He has extensive experience with bass, drums and guitar. His most recent project is named Gold Jacket.

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